The Genetic Impact of Malnutrition

Anakind

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http://www.tdh.ch/en/news/a-bomb-is-ticking-the-genetic-impact-of-malnutrition



A bomb is ticking: the genetic impact of malnutrition

Human beings are able to adapt genetically to their environment in order to survive. It is one of the fundamental principles of human evolution. However, new implications are gradually being revealed by science. For example, a mother’s diet during foetal development, as well as a child’s feeding when very young, is proving to have genetic consequences that have until now been little known about. These new data must have an impact on programmes to combat malnutrition.

Epigenetics: a new science?

Epigenetics is the study of the way the environment influences our genes.

“Our genetic heritage, made up of our DNA, is like our voice,” explains Professor Michel Roulet, medical advisor on health to Terre des hommes (Tdh). “It belongs to us and does not change. But external factors can influence its flow. It is these factors that makes up epigenetics.”

It seems that the diet of a mother during pregnancy, and a child’s during the first five years of life, is one of the factors that can influence an individual’s genetics. “This link is not new” Professor Roulet points out. “At the end of the Second World War, doctors started studying this phenomenon and the impact that famines had on the long-term health of children. They suggested that mothers who had suffered malnutrition during pregnancy gave birth to babies with growth retardation. But, more importantly, if these children quickly regained a normal diet in the first few years of life, their life expectancy was then reduced. In fact they became significantly vulnerable to a whole range of diseases: cardiovascular, hypertension, diabetes, etc. These doctors were initially treated as cranks and it took several decades before their conclusions started to be considered seriously. Today, the impact of diet is well recognised and there are countless publications on the subject. However, our understanding of the implications of this finding for our everyday life is still only in an early stage.”

A ticking time bomb

Growth retardation in a foetus or small child that has suffered malnutrition is part of the human capacity to adapt to an unfavourable environment. During the first years of life, our genes are malleable and can be shaped by external factors. “It is as if the child was programming itself to be poor” Professor Roulet explains. The child’s body adapts to a significant nutritional deficiency, and some organs develop better and faster than others to allow the child to survive. This change is then passed on for several generations. As a result one could find in a child’s genes the traces of a malnutrition suffered by his grandmother, for instance.

“Problems are magnified when the environment for which the child has been preparing changes suddenly” Professor Roulet continues. “The child’s body cannot keep up and the chances of developing a serious disease are multiplied. These predispositions are then passed on to the child’s children and grandchildren.”

We are all affected

This phenomenon does not only affect developing countries.

Any unbalanced diet during pregnancy or the first few years of life has the same consequences. Developed countries, which have seen an explosion in childhood obesity levels, or the populations of big cities in developing countries that have experienced a sudden improvement in living conditions are also affected. We are all equal in the face of this phenomenon.

However, this universal problem is likely to become subject to a two-tier development. All the food security agencies in developed countries are becoming drawn into the issue and launch researches on epigenetics. In the meantime, food and drug industries are rubbing their hands at the prospect of this new and potentially lucrative market. But how does this affect the fight against malnutrition?

The fight against malnutrition must adapt

There is almost no literature dealing with the link between epigenetics and the fight against malnutrition in small children. “However, these new developments should be taken into account at the highest levels,” declares Professor Roulet. “In projects to combat severe acute malnutrition, our number-one priority is usually to ensure that children gain weight as quickly as possible. But in so doing, we place children in an environment for which they are not prepared.”

Should we not intervene then? “Not at all: children suffering sever acute malnutrition are at risk of dying. We must intervene. But it is essential to bring about managed recovery. If we make children grow too rapidly, we save their lives in the short term, but we increase their risk of developing very serious diseases later on, and of passing on these predispositions to their own children. The speed of recovery must therefore be slowed down so that the environmental change is as gradual as possible. However, in the period in which children are regaining normal weight, their immune system is at its lowest and they risk developing potentially fatal infections. We have to find the best possible balance between these two opposing concerns, and the answer to this will probably remain unresolved for many years to come.”


Terre des hommes intervenes in the field of health and nutrition in 15 countries through 19 different projects. In 2010, more than 700,000 people benefited from activities implemented by Tdh.


@"paulus" @"MENTAL_CEL" @"Brotha Techno" @"BlueBalls"
 
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I wish I supplementmaxed during my early years. Maybe I would have reached 7' master race by 13 years old instead of a weak 6'4.5 barefoot.
 

paulus

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Proof once again that the first years of living and the prenatal years are the most important one
 

kibo

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RecessedPhiltrum said:
>living in the west
>malnutrition

:giggle: :giggle:


:bye:
kids are fed with fast food garbage in their crucial years
i would be anxious as fuck not to screw up on these things  if i were raising the kid
 

Anakind

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RecessedPhiltrum said:
>living in the west
>malnutrition
:facepalm:
[hr]
kibo said:
kids are fed with fast food garbage in their crucial years
i would be anxious as fuck not to screw up on these things  if i were raising the kid
He wouldn't understand as he's too lazy to even read the article.
 

Herald

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kibo said:
RecessedPhiltrum said:
>living in the west
>malnutrition

:giggle: :giggle:
kids are fed with fast food garbage in their crucial years
i would be anxious as fuck not to screw up on these things  if i were raising the kid
 

MENTAL_CEL

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RecessedPhiltrum said:
>living in the west
>malnutrition

:giggle: :giggle:


:bye:
Is possible with a garbage diet of refined foods, sufficient calories doesn't always= sufficient nutrition.
 

BlueBalls

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:banderas:

I always ate very little and when I ate it was potato chips, pasta and ketchup.

No wonder I'm 5'10 and framecel
 

Anakind

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BlueBalls said:
:banderas:

I always ate very little and when I ate it was potato chips, pasta and ketchup.

No wonder I'm 5'10 and framecel
I found out today that most potato chips even contain caffeine.   :lol:
 

Browmog

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I am quite sure I ate better than my grandfather in his youth and I am 6'3 while he was 6'6.
It's all genetics, either you have them or you don't.
I just didn't got the right recombination.
 

Anakind

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Browmog said:
I am quite sure I ate better than my grandfather in his youth and I am 6'3 while he was 6'6.
It's all genetics, either you have them or you don't.
I just didn't got the right recombination.
You mean you either have genes or you don't? Interesting.   :lol:
 

Browmog

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Anakind said:
Browmog said:
I am quite sure I ate better than my grandfather in his youth and I am 6'3 while he was 6'6.
It's all genetics, either you have them or you don't.
I just didn't got the right recombination.
You mean you either have genes or you don't? Interesting.   :lol:
I mean the right recombination of genes.
How would you explain this case otherwise?
 

BlueBalls

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It's over, I was just at the gym (too little too late) and I got framemogged so fucking hard.

There were two weight lifter girls there and my frame was only slightly bigger than theirs.

When I did bicep curls in front of the mirror I got a good look at my pathetic shoulders. And it felt like everthing was just pointless after that.

I would do anything for shoulders like these:



If my gymcelling doesn't yield results I will get fucking implants -I'm serious.
[hr]
I need to have 50cm+ bideltoid
 

Anakind

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Browmog said:
Anakind said:
You mean you either have genes or you don't? Interesting.   :lol:
I mean the right recombination of genes.
How would you explain this case otherwise?
You're talking about an individual case. How tall you end up depends on thousands of different factors during your development. Apart from that, it's really debatable whether your diet was better than that of your grandfather.
[hr]
BlueBalls said:
...And it felt like everthing was just pointless after that.
Know that feel. Those are the typical trigger events that initiate the next depressive episode.
 

Browmog

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Anakind said:
Browmog said:
I mean the right recombination of genes.
How would you explain this case otherwise?
You're talking about an individual case. How tall you end up depends on thousands of different factors during your development. Apart from that, it's really debatable whether your diet was better than that of your grandfather.
[hr]
BlueBalls said:
...And it felt like everthing was just pointless after that.
Know that feel. Those are the typical trigger events that initiate the next depressive episode.
I know for sure that it was.
 

ethniccoper

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Nutrition is still extremely important til around 13-14. I have 6 cousins all have the same mom and dad, all the oldest who are in the  late 20's and early 30's are 5'8. They all were raised in another poor country without optimal nutritition. The youngest (18) and the only one raised in the US who enjoyed the best nutrition happened to grow 6'1 and amogs his brothers in every single aspect. Not everything is genetics boyos.
 

Nizoral Babe

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My mother was always worried about my brother and I getting proper nutrition, so she made sure my brother and I ate everything that was put on the table or we weren't able to leave. As we grew older, my brother started to protest and picked at his food, often leaving the vegetables and such uneaten. I would instead eat his share, sometimes we'd even do it while her back was turned so she'd think he ate his food. I turned out to be 2-3 inches taller, 2-3 inches broader and at a similar BF about 20-30 lbs heavier.

Another interesting thing is that my skull and bone structure is noticeably bigger than his. I was a month overdue, my mother actually had the be induced and she had an emergency c-section. Had I stayed in the womb longer it could have been life threatening to her. I generally associate the two together and not just a coincidence. 

Nutrition is super important, imo.
 

FuckThis

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If you ate normal shit like i dunno meat,potato,bread you have ZERO risk of malnurishment. 

It is just a modern diet fad. 

You can see people in 1950 all look much bettter then we,and all of them eated just normal meals
 
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