sfinkter

Coper
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
507
Reputation
0
@"mrz"

I think I saw you quoting a guy that got put in jail over stuff the feds found on his computer, like "this is why you should delete your SATA drives/other type of storage..." because the guy tried deleting his the information off his computer but didn't do it 'deep' enough and the computer forensics/IT people recovered information that incriminated him to put him in jail.

How do I clean my computer completely of any possible self-incriminating information if I happened to have information like that (I don't) somehow?
 

JustTheWayYouAre

King of Chads
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
10,900
Reputation
7
What about the various apps like "Eraser" etc., how useful are these apps based on numerous cycles of rewriting?
 

JustTheWayYouAre

King of Chads
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
10,900
Reputation
7
mrz said:
JustTheWayYouAre said:
What about the various apps like "Eraser" etc., how useful are these apps based on numerous cycles of rewriting?
These programs are single file overwrite usually, which as previously mentioned is just not forensically secure, even if they try to target multiple known spots that forensic traces could be based on the files name, they just are not safe to rely on for getting every bit of forensic trace evidence related to the file, there are numerous case studies of people who relied on the single file overwrite programs getting pwnt from the trace evidence.

Having a bazillion overwrite cycles doesn't matter, it's not that they are failing to make the data they overwrite irrecoverable, it's that they are not finding all of the traces of the file to attempt to overwrite them in the first place. The only secure way to find all traces of the file to overwrite + to overwrite them, is to use a full drive overwriting solution.

I don't know if Eraser is a single file overwrite program or a full drive overwrite program though, but typically the toolset consists of (DBAN, ATA Secure Erase, ATA Enhanced Secure Erase), and if you are using anything else you are probably doing it wrong, unless it is some program that wraps ATA Secure Erase in which case it is possibly doing it right, though it is better to issue the commands from CLI and a live CD linux terminal yourself rather than rely on a third party wrapper to make it easier for you.

One to two passes of random data is enough to securely overwrite, more passes of random data isn't going to hurt but simply is a waste of time.
Thanks for the comprehensive response. Eraser offers various erasing options (up to several cycles of overwriting + erasing of the cluster data, wiping of the free space etc.), but seems to be meaningless unless all the possible traces
are addressed.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
3,157
Reputation
1
I mean all your guides are about HDDs not flash memory.

SSD is taking over the personal computer market, especially laptops that your average pedophile is most likely to use.

So is it harder to reconstruct wiped data  from an SSD that has been cleaned with using software compared to the HDD?
 

feg

Chad
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
4,557
Reputation
0
Aryan Australian said:
I periodically throw my HDDs in the ocean
slayer
[hr]
The Masked Magician said:
I mean all your guides are about HDDs not flash memory.

SSD is taking over the personal computer market, especially laptops that your average pedophile is most likely to use.

So is it harder to reconstruct wiped data  from an SSD that has been cleaned with using software compared to the HDD?
it's a conspiracy
 
// Infolinks