Ray Peat, or how to regain you hair, youth and freedom.

kunikus

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THE BOOK:
https://www.4shared.com/office/aoDVUBgf/hair_like_a_fox.html



http://oi61.tinypic.com/2nkubzq.jpg




[font=georgia,times,serif,]Estrogen, memory and heredity: Imprinting and the stress response[/font]


[font=georgia,times,serif]IN OUTLINE:

Stresses, including estrogen excess, activate the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP), the stress-proteins, a primitive defense system.
Heat Shock Proteins and "hormone receptors" are closely related and interdependent.
Stress (at least partly via HSP) activates viral expression, ordinary gene expression, and destabilizes the genome, activating the "endonucleases," enzymes which break up DNA chains.
Stress increases genetic variability.
DNA chains can be chemically modified (e.g., methylated) in a way that limits enzymes' accesss, probably as protection, and to regulate gene expression.
Genes, and subsequent growth and development, are modified by the prenatal hormonal environment, that of the newborn, and even that of the parents before conception..."

"...
[size=medium][font=georgia,times,serif]We are "imprinted" by our mothers' hormonal and nutritional conditions, but we can intervene to correct these "inherited" conditions, by maintaining optimal hormonal and nutritional balances..." [/font]
[/font][/size]


[font=georgia,times,serif]"...Recent work in several areas of biology is showing that heredity is not rigidly deterministic, in the way implied by traditional genetics, and it is opening the way for the development of therapies for incurable, chronic, or congenital problems, in natural and holistic ways that don't involve the mechanistic interventions of "gene therapy" or "genetic engineering." For example, nontoxic treatments for cancer that were demonstrated decades ago, were discarded because they didn't seem consistent with "genetics." Many problems that are classified as congenital or genetic, turn out to be physiological, and correctable. Even the brain and the heart, which until recently were considered to be incapable of regenerative repair, are now seen to be capable of great anatomical flexibility.[/font]

[font=georgia,times,serif,Times New Roman]
There are still great authoritarian forces opposed to recognizing, and supporting, the organism's full potential. The most useful therapies will remain in obscurity until many people see that those therapies have a firmer scientific foundation than orthodox (antiquated) medical genetics has..."[/font]
[font=georgia,times,serif,Times New Roman]
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/imprinting.shtml

[size=medium][font=georgia,times,serif]Serotonin, depression, and aggression: The problem of brain energy[/font]


[/font][/size]
Heart failure, hypertension, muscle hyperalgesia (Babenko, et al., 2000), some panic reactions, and other maladaptive biological events associated with problems of energy metabolism, are promoted by excessive serotonin.

Autistic children and their relatives have high concentrations of serotonin in their serum and platelets. Members of a family tend to eat the same foods and to share other environmental conditions. Prenatal hypothyroidism and various kinds of imprinting, including hyperestrogenism, could account for this. Some studies have reported that thyroid supplements help autistic children, and anti-serotonin drugs have caused improvement in both children and adults...."

"...Many of the symptoms produced by excess serotonin are also the symptoms of hypothyroidism. Thyroid, progesterone, and high quality protein nutrition are central to protection against the serotonin syndromes. (Progesterone, like LSD, can inhibit the firing of serotonergic nerves, but an overdose, unlike LSD, never produces hallucinations.)

One of the many actions of the "SSRI" (such as fluoxetine, Prozac), which aren’t related to their effect on serotonin, is to increase the concentration of allopregnanolone in the brain, imitating the action of increased progesterone..."

"...[font=georgia,times,serif]If we think biologically, starting with the role of serotonin as a damage-induced inflammatory mediator, we can speculate that an infinite number of irritating substances will be “serotonin reuptake inhibitors.” The particular history of the “third generation antidepressants” is one that should disturb our tranquility.[/font]


http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/serotonin-depression-aggression.shtml
 

IcedEarth

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nice theory but I don't see any concrete advice, so wtf do I do with my hair?
 

kunikus

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TLDR: Follow the diet of the book.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/AV-Skeptics/conversations/topics/5523

Ray Peat's personal diet"


Okay, Bruce, this is a summary from my correspondance with her about
what Ray Peat eats (or ate, if he's changed things) and what he
recommends. This is from 2005.

- dairy, fruit and meat are the core of his diet.

dairy for the protein, calcium, and other nutrients
fruits (or other sugars as 2nd choice) for the KAs and EAAs
gelatin to balance the aminos and to replace the need for eating
animal brains and other organs muscle meat as a supplement for
protein magnesium, etc.

- he gets from 120 to 150 grams of protein per day. Doesn't feel quite
right when he goes as low as 100. A few quarts of milk, several ounces
of cheese, gelatin in some form (broth, chicharrones, gummy bears,
etc.), at least a quart of orange juice (or equivalent other fruit),
and the occasional (rotating) eggs, shellfish, fish, and beef, bison,
or lamb, in one or two of his meals.

- says one must always balance protein with sugar (fruit being the
best) because protein alone lowers blood sugar and you need the sugar
to better metabolize the protein. So when he eats protein, he eats
sugar with it: about 1:1 fruit to meat, and about 2:1 fruit to cheese.

- says best to limit meat due to the tryptophan and antimetabolic
properties, but it can be handled if consumed with fruit and gelatin.
He does eat meat almost every day, or just beef or lamb broth When
the meat is aged he doesn't like the taste so he doesn't eat much of it.

- he eats meat with gelatin. The gelatin can be either from regular
powder or from broth cooked no more than 3 hours (otherwise you
degrade the nutrients he says).

- he avoids all fatty fish.

- says chicken should be eaten no more than one meal every 10 days due
to toxins and PUFAs.

- eggs where the chickens are fed corn and soy should be minimally
consumed (for him 2 per week if that), and with one egg you need about
10 ounces of OJ to balance it (because egg protein is a powerful
insulin activator).

- he eats shellfish about once every ten days. Shrimp, scallops,
lobsters have a high ratio of protein to unsaturated fat and help to
insure adequate selenium. Cooks them thoroughly, having known people
who got hepatitis from raw seafood.

- rotates his animal protein sources only because he gets tired of the
same meals, no health reason

- he avoids most vegetables due to their intrinsic (defensive) toxins.
He occasionally makes leaf broth for some extra minerals, but usually
prefers for a cow to process them for him. Mainly he thinks of them as
condiments.

- underground (root/tuber) vegetables are okay if cooked for about 40
minutes, and fruit-vegetables (tomatoes, peppers) are okay if you're
not allergic to them.

- he avoids all other above-ground vegetables, including greens and
many herbs (basil, etc) due to toxins (even if cooked) that far
outweigh the benefits.

- says that cooked young squashes are generally good for everyone, and
although raw shredded carrots are "nutrient subtractive," it's good to
have a plate of them every day because they lower estrogen (and thus
stimulate the thyroid) and accelerate peristalsis.

- he avoids fermented foods. Stopped using black pepper (a fermented
food, apparently) about 30 years ago when he saw the toxicity studies.
Avoids things like apple cider because it is frequently contaminated
with fungal poisons. Says that the more nutritious it is, the more
likely to contain fungal estrogen and other harmful things, unless you
know the actual materials and process used in making it.
Lacto-fermented foods are carcinogenic. Cheese is okay being fermented
because of the strong nutrients in the milk to start with that
vegetables don't have.

- says reason for people's negative reactions to dairy (if the milk
isn't contaminated) is from either preexisting gut damage (from
gluten, for example) or from a low thyroid or protein deficiency
problem. People who are under stress from low thyroid or protein
deficiency have considerable trouble adapting he says, but with
gradual changes (adding dairy back in) the tissues will adjust and do
what they have to do.

- says to eat liver only occasionally because it depresses the thyroid.

- he doesn't eat fruits with seeds that can't be avoided (berries,
figs, etc) because while the antioxidants are good, the benefits are
less than the toxins in the seeds. Other fruits like peaches, plums,
apples, etc should only be eaten if organic and tree-ripened;
otherwise they have very powerful toxins (if unripe or shelf-ripened)
that can cause gut damage. Melons, cherries, and citrus are the best
fruits.

- when off-season, says it's better to eat frozen fruit and juice
rather than rely on importation because many studies show that storage
methods and stress from importation and treatments make them carcinogenic.

- with cheese and milk, the feeding of the animals (grassfed vs.
grainfed) is more the issue than raw vs. pasteurized.

- he avoids all grains. Traditional "proper preparation" methods used
throughout the world to render them less harmful involved using
alkaline mediums such as wood ash (as opposed to "acidic" as Sally
Fallon suggests) and "lime" as in calcium oxide (as opposed to "lime
or lemon juice" as Sally Fallon asserts). Research shows that that
these methods will convert some of the tryptophan to niacin. Using
whey would be especially ineffective as well as problematic due to the
tryptophan.
 

IcedEarth

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I got both gluten and lactose intolerance so I was forced to eat like this, lol at the vegetables, sounds like broscience
 

kunikus

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That's his own diet, he is like 79.

Here's the general diet:

Proteins:
Daily protein should be at least 80 grams, preferably 100 if you are working or otherwise active. An egg has about 6 grams, a quart of milk about 32 grams, meat, cheese, and fish are usually about 20% protein, so a pound would be enough for a day. It's important to have fruit or other carbohydrate with the protein for efficient metabolism. Milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish are good protein sources, and potato protein is high in quality, if the potato is very well cooked and eaten with butter or cream. Although potatoes contain only about 2% protein, a kilogram of potato has roughly the protein value of a liter of milk (which is 3% protein), because of its high quality. Unless you are buying eggs from a verified grass-fed, free range source he recommends limiting them to one or two a day, and making sure to have plenty of carbohydrate around the same time to prevent sugar crash.

Meats like ground beef, steak, liver, and pork chops are rich in cysteine, which “turns off” the thyroid gland as soon as your body uses up it’s glycogen and ideally shouldn't be your main source of protein. Muscle meats should be eaten with the gelatin it comes with, or supplemental gelatin (see below), to balance out an anti-thyroid amino acid called tryptophan (which is also found in whey protein formulations). Traditionally, muscle meats are eaten with the fat, skin and the gelatin that they come with, so this is mostly an issue in first-world countries where we have protein powders and pure muscle meats readily available. Chicken liver contains such a small amount of fat it's okay to have in addition to or instead of beef liver (which should be consumed weekly). Pork or chicken every 7- 10 days is okay if your metabolic rate (thyroid function) is good. When chicken is stewed, gelatin from the skin is valuable, and much of the fat can be skimmed off(just remember chicken is not optimal). With any of the muscle meats, including fish, gelatin is helpful for balancing the high cysteine, methionine, and tryptophan content. Regarding bacon, Peat says, “The nitrate isn't likely to be a problem if you eat it with orange juice. I fry the bacon to remove some of the fat, and then refry it in coconut oil, to remove most of the PUFA.”

Fatty fish like salmon and herring should be avoided because their fat content is mostly unsaturated; as a general rule, cold blooded animals like fish tend to produce unsaturated fats while warm blooded animals like cows and pigs tend to produce saturated and monounsaturated fats. Cod and sole are good fish, since they have the marine minerals (especially selenium), but low fat content. Tuna is good as protein, but the fat it contains is highly polyunsaturated; eating once a week, especially with homemade coconut mayo should be safe.of course

Regarding his recommendation of daily gelatin:
For an adult, gelatin can be a major protein in the diet, since the need for cysteine and tryptophan decreases greatly when growth slows. Ox-tail soup (boiled for 4 or 5 hours) and lamb shanks have a good proportion of gelatin. I think most stores have gelatin in one pound packages or bigger, for example Great Lakes gelatin is usually around $11 per pound. If a person eats a large serving of meat, it's probably helpful to have 5–10 grams of gelatin at approximately the same time, so that the amino acids enter the blood stream in balance. Asian grocery stores are likely to sell some of the traditional gelatin-rich foods, such as prepared pig skin and ears and tails, and chicken feet. Although the prepared powdered gelatin doesn't require any cooking, dissolving it in hot water makes it digest a little more quickly. It can be incorporated into custards, mousses, ice cream, soups, sauces, cheese cake, pies, etc., or mixed with fruit juices to make desserts or (with juice concentrate) candies.

Peat is a big fan of dairy. He prefers milk with no added vitamins, raw if you can get it, but uses standard pasteurized-homogenized when there’s no alternative. He prefers cheese made without enzymes, just animal rennet. He doesn't use yogurt because of the lactic acid and/or lactobacillus. He avoids anything with gums in it, like cream cheese. Ice cream like Haagen Dazs is okay since it has no carageenan or gums like guar/carob bean– these are often found in foods like cream cheese, canned coconut milk, and half-and-half; make sure that the ice cream does not have any vegetable oil in it as some varieties include this. Regarding yogurt, in quantities of an ounce or so, for flavoring, it's o.k., but the lactic acid content isn't good if you are using yogurt as a major source of your protein and calcium; it triggers the inflammatory reactions, leading to fibrosis eventually, and the immediate effect is to draw down the liver's glycogen stores for energy to convert it into glucose. Cottage cheese, that is, milk curds with salt, is very good, if you can find it without additives, but traditional cottage cheese was almost fat-free, so when they make it with whole milk you should watch for other innovations that might not be beneficial.

Although Peat basically scorns legumes, he said hummus in small amounts isn't nutritionally harmful, though chickpeas and tahini are both allergenic for some people.

Fats:
Best sources are coconut oil and butter; olive oil and macadamia nut oil sparingly. He is a big fan of (refined) coconut oil to stimulate the metabolism. Among nuts and nut oils, macadamia is probably the safest. See the Omega-6 list below for more info.

Carbohydrates:
Have some with every meal to prevent hypoglycemia after eating the proteins.
Fruit and fruit juices – If you're able to do it, try to consume fresh fruits and fruit juices every day. Orange juice is great because of it’s potassium and magnesium content. Tropical fruits and juices are excellent too. If you don’t have a juicer at home, you can buy pasteurized juices with no additives that say “not from concentrate” on the label. Juices that are from concentrate are made up of mostly added water that is flouridated. Fruits in general are fine (tropical are best), but grapefruit is full of phytoestrogens, so avoid it, and berries are full of small seeds you can't avoid, so it's better to skip them. He recommends avoiding bananas and other starchy-poorly-ripened-industrialized fruits, which includes most apples and pears (when these are ripe, peeled and cooked they are much more nutritious, and safer). Organic dried fruits are fine as long as they are not treated with sulfur dioxide; canned fruits are okay, especially if they are in glass. You can have a small apple and some cheese as a snack occasionally if it doesn't cause any digestive or allergic symptoms—the fat in the cheese is protective against the starch in incompletely ripened fruit.

Tubers – Potato, yams; occasionally well-cooked grains in the order of best to least desirable: masa harina, white rice or oats, brown rice. The phytic acid in the oats block absorption of much of the calcium; cooking the oats much longer than usual might improve its nutritional value. Canned plain pumpkin if eaten with some fat is okay, but carrots are less starchy for similar effects.

He recommends eating a raw carrot daily, particularly a raw carrot salad with coconut oil, for both its bowel-protective and an anti-estrogen effect. Summer squash and bamboo shoots are the best cooked vegetables; well cooked kale and broccoli are okay, too. Carrots are best salad. The fiber in whole vegetables helps protect against the effects of the unsaturated fats they contain (in comparison to fruit), which means that juiced vegetables with none of the protective fiber will act as a thyroid inhibitor because of the concentrated PUFAs. There isn’t anything wrong with using vegetables as a smaller part of your diet, but salads and steamed vegetable dishes shouldn’t be the main part of anyone’s diet. He recommends avoiding avocados as they contain so much unsaturated fat that they can be carcinogenic and hepatotoxic (toxic to the liver).

Beverages:
Coffee supports the metabolism but has to be consumed with some sugar or with meal to prevent stress response due to low blood sugar. Because of the tannins in tea, it's important to use either lemon or milk (or cream). The histamine in red wine is a special problem for hypothyroid people, usually it isn't harmful.

Avoid:
PUFAs and soy. PUFAs are found in processed foods, nuts and seeds and their butters, vegetable oils, margarine. Also keep in mind that if you have been eating PUFAs in the past, the oil change in your tissues takes up to four years during which your fat stores will be releasing enough PUFAs to cause you some troubles, so it requires some patience and also some skillful means to counteract their effects, like getting some extra vitamin E or a little thyroid to counteract their antithyroid action etc. It all depends on how your metabolism works.

Chocolate is okay as long as there are no additives.

For salty cravings, Peat recommends tortilla chips fried in coconut oil, and chicharrones (pork rinds) with no additive but salt (puffed in hot air). Another snack is popcorn popped on the stove in coconut oil, then salted & buttered; the oil and butter are protective against the starch, but it's harder to digest than tortilla chips or chicharrones.

For salt use Mortons Canning and Pickling salt.

Vinegar is a good antiseptic when it's used with raw carrot, but watch for sulfite when using regularly.

Maple syrup is heated to a fairly high temperature, and this creates some sugar-derived chemicals that can be allergenic and might be toxic.

Regarding whey protein, Peat says, “Powdered foods that contain tryptophan are extremely susceptible to harmful oxidation, and the best things are removed, for example calcium, lactose, and casein, with its anti-stress properties.”


Remember to download the book:

https://www.4shared.com/office/aoDVUBgf/hair_like_a_fox.html
 

IcedEarth

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I do most of those things already and will complete with what's missing

thanks
 

kunikus

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IcedEarth said:
I do most of those things already and will complete with what's missing

thanks

Okay m8, I hope you benefit from this.
 

kunikus

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Simon Nessman said:
Seems like MASSIVE broscience, coping and effort made up by a retard who has no evidence whatsoever to support his claims

Did you read the book? or at least the image I posted?
 

IcedEarth

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actually the lactose intolerance induced by gut damage due to gluten sensitivity is legit, that's my current issue
 
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holy shit this is so much information to control for...
but generally i agree with him:
i think meat/milk (organic)/fish/potatoes are top tier.
legumes/nuts/grains and products out of it (like pasta/rice/cereals) are shit.

but i always thought vegetables like carrots,kale,broccoli were god-tier too. he doesnt really like them. he likes the fruits therefore, and i always thought they were useless and gave you nothing but bad carbs.

what i definitely need to add to my list of food is gelantine and coconut oil.
 

kunikus

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IcedEarth said:
actually the lactose intolerance induced by gut damage due to gluten sensitivity is legit, that's my current issue

Try cyproheptadine, cheap as fuck and safe.

http://www.raypeatforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=75&t=2508


Start with 0.5 the first week, then you can try 4-8mg a day.

Also a daily carrot with apple cider vinegar in the afternoon, with an empty stomach.

“Something as simple as a grated carrot
with salt and vinegar can produce major
changes in bowel health, reducing
endotoxin absorption, and restoring
constructive hormonal functions.”
Ray Peat, PhD

Use sea salt.


pringles said:
Yea, more retarded diet nonsense.

You know you're a beta deludedcel when you're following some diet-guru's advice like religion. Ray Peat is nw4 judging by google pictures as well, lol.

You can't claim to be redpill and then be looking for magic-pill diets that will solve your looks and issues, then you're just a bluepiller. Or most likely an overweight middle-aged woman eating up snakeoil and circlejerking with other middle aged women on forums about progesterone pills and an all meat diet. Lol.

Just eat a normal fucking diet and take fish oil. Scientifically proven to optimize your health (but you still won't become good looking, you naive deludedcel).

1. He is like 79.

2. Not a religion, it's proved by science.

3. *Most fish oil supplements are toxic, they rot.

The German Dream said:
holy shit this is so much information to control for...
but generally i agree with him:
i think meat/milk (organic)/fish/potatoes are top tier.
legumes/nuts/grains and products out of it (like pasta/rice/cereals) are shit.

but i always thought vegetables like carrots,kale,broccoli were god-tier too. he doesnt really like them. he likes the fruits therefore, and i always thought they were useless and gave you nothing but bad carbs.

what i definitely need to add to my list of food is gelantine and coconut oil.

you can eat  potatoes as long as they're peeled and well cooked.

carrots are top tier, meat too, just add coffee to avoid iron absorption, and eat meats with gelatin.

broccoli can suppress thyroid function if it's raw, kale's ok, but not so tasty, fish is filled with mercury.

change to sea salt without additives, cheap as fuck.
 

HarryBalls

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Not sure if his diet is healthy but what concerns hair- it is total bullshit.

Men need to stop blaming themselves for this balding curse. It's not your diet, not the ammount of sun your head gets, not warm showers, not masturbation that causes you to lose hair - its your fucking inferior shitty genetics.


Brb



Peat




Norwood 4 that most likely had a hair transplant




Don't tell me these guys ate balanced diet of gellatin and shit














 

Nizoral Babe

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Looks like a crock of shit to me. My hair stopped falling out on a ketogenic diet alone. Completely opposite of what he recommends. Just lol @ him for not believing in fermented foods and healthy bacteria.
 

zanz

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Lookism is full of retards that eat like crap and then go MUUUUUUUUUH GENETICS IS WHY IM A LOSER WAAAAAAAH
 

kunikus

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There's no Ray Peat diet, there's a diet that suits YOU, your own situation, and a diet that is HELPFUL and not HARMFUL to YOU.

If you want to have a low bf, then go keto, but for example avoid cheese with carragenan, eat the real thing. if you want to eat chicharrones, avoid their fat, people are feeding pork with seeds and now lard contains a lot of PUFA's, use butter as you wish without additives.

If you are stressed its better to eat sugar, carbohydrate and to avoid fasting.

If you have a fucked up gut then avoid most vegetables and endotoxin (the shell of the potatoes), eat white rice instead of brown, eat a carrot with apple cider vinegar to promote bowel health, you guys didn't even read the pic I posted.

And you don't need to avoid the things he doesn't eat, he doesn't eat certain things because he doesn't find them TASTY, but that's HIM.

Ray Peat ideas = you either help the body with what you eat or you do harm. You can use your diet to manage your congenital conditions.

The author of the book I posted is not Peat, it's a guy who's explaining how to use Peat's ideas to promote hair growth.
 

kunikus

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Simon Nessman said:
Ray peat is purely anecdotal and there are no scientific experiments with people running his diet that can prove his claims.

You can see plenty of studies that he cites to backup his theories at the end of the articles.
 

Vertu

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He has fucking AWFUL diet advice.

No fatty fish? LOL.

Gelatin, as in gummy bears? LOL.

Avoids vegetables? LOL.

He looks like fucking absolute DOG-SHIT to boot.



Meanwhile, take a look at a LEGIT dietician around the same age (my boy, Nicholas Perricone, the god)



Fucking aspies on this forum don't know how to eat properly.
 

PucciBoi

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i'm tryna try a non-primitive liquid diet (no wasting time on food) inspired by rp

orange juice, skim milk, 1 juiced raw carrot, 4 sticks of falim everrrry day

what do you rate it nutritionally speaking :H:
 

kunikus

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PucciBoi said:
i'm tryna try a non-primitive liquid diet (no wasting time on food) inspired by rp

orange juice, skim milk, 1 juiced raw carrot, 4 sticks of falim everrrry day

what do you rate it nutritionally speaking :H:

Try to eat the carrot with the empty stomach, I would add some meat and gelatin here and there, and definitely butter and cheese m8, liver at least once every 9 days, and cocoa powder without additives.

Drink some coffee with the cocoa and meat to avoid iron absorption.
 

FuckThis

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Hair loss is about 90 percent genetics. You can maybe do a little detail here and there, but everything else is genetics

You can eat bread your entire life and you will have hair if good genes are present
 
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