IBERBERIANs are comically ugly /framecel

Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
http://www.theapricity.com/forum/sh...at-s-up-with-the-Atlantic-Fuckade-myths/page1

microcephalic(tiny headed),bug eyes,melted faces,gracile frames of a 14 yr old white girl.

manlets.


theres a myth on this forum that any goodlooking latino has iberian admix,when its usually the opposite.the most ugly latinos are iberian influenced.there are dark mestizos with 54% spanish ancestry on dna charts.


the most alpha humans are the uto-Aztecans of northern mexico whom the castillian pirates saw as giants btw they also frequentely praised taino looks.

Aztecs came from north and were related to other uto aztecan peoples featured in western films


they only lsot because their southern vassals betrayed them for spanish rule  +  epedemics of smallpox


this is the uto aztecan homeland
[see red  areas)





[hr]
[img=82x121]http://************/download/file.php?avatar=610_1449101693.jpg[/img]
willymonfret  Posts: 4312Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2014 10:11 pm








willymonfret » 1 day ago
this guy is triracial shit.he shouldnt be confused for a master amerindian.george lopez too is a balanced triracial,or quadraracial.Iberians are microsephelic and have tiny heads,poor zygos,melted faces and gracile frames,in fact the average westeuro woman has a head breadth greater than a normal spaniard male.

Im sick of these iberberian muttspawn and their inferior looks(DERIVED from iberians)being attributted to amerindians,especially seeing that the Uto-Aztekans were in general alpha margid race of BBCs and robust giants
 

YourFaceIsYourLife

LTR = cuck | Effort = it's over | Sun = life
Masculinity Crew
Joined
Nov 10, 2015
Messages
6,388
Reputation
1,581
Yes Aztecs were superior to Spaniards that's why Cortez conquered entire Aztec empire with 300 men

:cage:
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
Yes Aztecs were superior to Spaniards that's why Cortez conquered entire Aztec empire with 300 men
what the fuck?300 men? 

https://books.google.nl/books?id=v6...AF#v=onepage&q=zapotec allies against&f=false




it was purely spanish allying with Aztec allies wich betrayed them  because they wanted to rule the Mexica empire.

The aztecs considered these tribes physichally inferior and frequentely dominated them in battle because of their greater height and strength ,90% of all european victories in  the americas were due to smallpox and epedemic diseases.
 

SINGULARITY

Gigachad
Joined
Jun 29, 2015
Messages
9,226
Reputation
12
ChiefofThechoctaws said:
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
Yes Aztecs were superior to Spaniards that's why Cortez conquered entire Aztec empire with 300 men
what the fuck?300 men? 

https://books.google.nl/books?id=v6...AF#v=onepage&q=zapotec allies against&f=false




it was purely spanish allying with Aztec allies wich betrayed them  because they wanted to rule the Mexica empire.

The aztecs considered these tribes physichally inferior and frequentely dominated them in battle because of their greater height and strength ,90% of all european victories in  the americas were due to smallpox and epedemic diseases.
Legit.

But come on bro race threads are annoying as fuck now
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
During the campaign, Cortés was given support from a number of tributaries and rivals of the Aztecs, including the Totonacs, and the Tlaxcaltecas, Texcocans, and other city-states particularly bordering Lake Texcoco. In their advance, the allies were tricked and ambushed several times by the peoples they encountered. After eight months of battles and negotiations, which overcame the diplomatic resistance of the Aztec Emperor Moctezuma II to his visit, Cortés arrived in Tenochtitlan on November 8, 1519, where he took up residence, welcomed by Moctezuma. When news reached Cortés of the death of several of his men during the Aztec attack on the Totonacs in Veracruz, he took the opportunity to take Moctezuma captive in his own palace and ruled through him for months. Capturing the cacique or indigenous ruler was standard operating procedure for Spaniards in their expansion in the Caribbean, so capturing Moctezuma had considerable precedent, which might well have included those in Spain during the Christian reconquest of territory held by Muslims



When the captured emperor Moctezuma II, now seen as a mere puppet of the invading Spaniards, attempted to calm the outraged populace, he was killed by a projectile.[6] Cortés, who by then had returned to Tenochtitlan and his men had to fight their way out of the capital city during the Noche Triste in June, 1520.
[hr]
There's little doubt that the ritual Aztec sacrifice contributed to the fall of the Aztec Empire, and in more ways than one.  First, killing thousands of people, whether you or your neighbours, simply can't be good for a society.  The loss of people in a loss that can't be calculated.  Who knows how it would have been different if these people and their children had swelled the ranks that fought the Spanish, not to mention the other contributions they would have made.

And although the Aztecs certainly weren't the first people ever to sacrifice humans, the fact that they did and the incredible number they sacrificed led to the hatred of some of the surrounding peoples.  The powerful city-state of Tlaxcala was one of these.  Many of their own had been sacrificed, and in the end they joined the Spaniards to fight the Aztecs.  It may be that the Spanish simply were an excuse to start what was already an inevitable civil war.




Disease played a huge part in the fall of the Aztec empire.  This is what happened.  After Cortes landed in Mexico, another Spanish army came from Cuba to make sure he followed orders.  Cortes would have none of that, and went to fight them.  In this new group was an African being held as a slave, who had smallpox, a very contagious disease.

One of Cortes' men contracted the disease.  When they returned, the Aztec army quickly overwhelmed the Spanish, killing many and causing the rest to retreat.  The soldier was killed, and, likely when his body was looted, an Aztec caught the disease.

Quickly, smallpox spread among the population.  The people had no resistance and no idea how to treat it.  In many cases, everyone in a house died.  With no time to bury so many people, houses were simply demolished over the bodies.

During the siege of Tenochtitlán in 1520, the population was not only low on food but dying of smallpox.  25% of the empire is said to have been lost to the disease alone.  But more importantly, the Aztec chain of command was in ruins.  The emperor, Cuitláhuac, died of smallpox, along with many of the leaders of the army. 



The tactics of the Spanish army certainly played a role. The Mexicas were simply used to playing by different rules. However, the Aztecs soon got wise to the ways that the Europeans fought, and this almost led to their victory. But Cortes still used clever tactics in the final siege that, in combination with his native allies and the epidemics of disease, brought about the fall of the Aztec empire.


Summary of events​
Here's a (very) brief summary of the fall of the Aztec empire, after the arrival of Hernando Cortes until the fall of Tenochtitlán (read a biography of Hernan Cortez here):

[*]1519 (March 4):  The Spaniards land in what is now Veracruz.  The natives greet him with gifts.  A contingent from Tenochtitlán also arrives with gifts.  Cortes showed force and demonstrated his canons, terrifying the messengers.
[*]Cortes sinks all the ships except one small vessel, and moves to the city-state of Tlaxcala.  Generally speaking they begin on friendly terms.
[*]The Spanish went on to Cholula.  It's unclear what happened, but in the end many people in the city were killed by the Spanish. Read more about Cholula here.
[*]1519 (Nov 8):  Cortes and army arrives at Tenochtitlán, and begin on good terms.  However, Cortes takes charge and demands tribute and some Roman Catholic shrines to replace the Aztec gods.
[*]Cortes returns to the coast to defeat a rival Spanish army.  The remaining soldiers join him.
[*]The Aztecs revolt, driving the Spanish from the city.   Cuitláhuac becomes emperor.
[*]The Spanish go to Tlaxcala and make an alliance with them
[*]Most Aztec cities are conquered, and a siege of Tenochtitlán begins
[*]1521 (13 August):  The last Aztec emperor, Cuauhtémoc, surrenders to Cortes.
 

YourFaceIsYourLife

LTR = cuck | Effort = it's over | Sun = life
Masculinity Crew
Joined
Nov 10, 2015
Messages
6,388
Reputation
1,581
No it's not 300 but 506 soldiers big fucking difference, point is that advanced civilization whipped out stone-age savages and you are now coping how pathetic :lol:
Don't open race threads anymore this isn't stormfront, carry your frustrations somwhere else.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
Bukowski said:
science
[hr]
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
No it's not 300 but 506 soldiers big fucking difference, point is that advanced civilization whipped out stone-age savages and you are now coping how pathetic :lol:
Don't open race threads anymore this isn't stormfront, carry your frustrations somwhere else.
da fuq.youre either a iberberian arab  demon or a lying jew.
 

YourFaceIsYourLife

LTR = cuck | Effort = it's over | Sun = life
Masculinity Crew
Joined
Nov 10, 2015
Messages
6,388
Reputation
1,581
ChiefofThechoctaws said:
Bukowski said:
science
[hr]
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
No it's not 300 but 506 soldiers big fucking difference, point is that advanced civilization whipped out stone-age savages and you are now coping how pathetic :lol:
Don't open race threads anymore this isn't stormfront, carry your frustrations somwhere else.
da fuq.youre either a iberberian arab  demon or a lying jew.
Aztecs were stone-age people who were whipped out by advanced civilization and now they speak spanish, what don't you understand?
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
Direct quote from Coon:

Several relatively complete anthropometric series give us a means of comparing Spaniards with other peoples. A series of 79 Spaniards measured in Madrid have head dimensions comparable to those of Yemenite Arabs, Oriental Jews, and Kabyles.

The point isn't who has contributed more to whom. If Moors today look subhuman because the spaniards spread their microcephaly to them, then congratulations, that's one advanced racial warfare tactic you executed there.

The point will remain that your facial and cranial metrics put you into the gracile med. category, not the bigger and more robust atlanto-med. kind. How many times do I have to repeat it?

izygomatic and cranial length do not work like that. Nevermind the fact that you are still short for europeans, your facial metrics for that time were simply pathetic. Greece was and still is a malnourished and poverty-stricken country yet their metrics were many tiers above yours at that time. Explain that.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
not even the dumbest shithead on lookism believes the Aztecs were stone age,except you.

This article was kindly written specially for us (well, we helped a little with the Aztecs bit...) by Katherine Ashenburg, prize-winning non-fiction author, lecturer and journalist. Her latest book, ‘The Dirt on Clean’, is a social history of Western cleanliness, which ‘holds a welcome mirror up to our intimate selves...’
[img=200x139]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_01_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 1: Some of the remaining ‘chinampas’, Xochimilco, near Mexico City (Click on image to enlarge)
Many things about Aztec civilization amazed the Spanish Conquistadores, including their intensive, highly productive agricultural system of chinampas or ‘floating gardens’ (Picture 1), and the size and sophistication of their great city Tenochtitlan (Picture 2). At a time in Europe when street cleaning was almost non-existent and people emptied their overflowing chamber pots into the streets as a matter of course, the Aztecs employed a thousand public service cleaners to sweep and water their streets daily, built public toilets in every neighbourhood, and transported human waste in canoes for use as fertilizer.
[img=250x131]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_02_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 2: The city of Tenochtitlan - painting by Luis Covarrubias, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City (Click on image to enlarge)
While London was still drawing its drinking water from the polluted River Thames as late as 1854, the Aztecs supplied their capital city with fresh water from the nearby hill of Chapultepec by means of two aqueducts, the first built by Netzahualcóyotl between 1466 and 1478, the second some 20 years later by the ruler Ahuitzotl. The symbolic importance of water to the Aztecs is clear from their (metaphorical) word for ‘city’ - altepetl which means literally ‘water-mountain’ in Náhuatl.
The aqueducts were described by Hernán Cortés in 1520: Along one of the causeways to this great city run two aqueducts made of mortar. Each one is two paces wide and some six feet deep, and along one of them a stream of very good fresh water, as wide as a man’s body, flows into the heart of the city and from this they all drink. The other, which is empty, is used when they wish to clean the first channel. Where the aqueducts cross the bridges, the water passes along some channels which are as wide as an ox; and so they serve the whole city.
[img=225x148]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_03_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 3: Stylized image of Aztec daily life: detail of mural by Regina Raúll ‘Paisaje Mexica’, 1964, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City (Click on image to enlarge)
But probably nothing seemed more bizarre to the Spaniards than the Aztec attitude to personal hygiene. In a word, they valued cleanliness. The conquistador Andres de Tapia reported, in a tone of wonder, that Montezuma bathed twice a day. He did, but there was nothing extraordinary about that for an Aztec, since everybody, according to the Jesuit historian Francisco Javier Clavijero, ‘bathed often, and many of them every day’ in the rivers, lakes or pools.
[img=300x125]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_04_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 4: Copalxocotl (‘soap-tree’) (Left); Xiuhamolli (soap plant) (Middle & Right) - L & M: Badianus Manuscript (pls 104 & 11), R: Florentine Codex Book 11 (Click on image to enlarge)
They lacked true soap but made up for it with the fruit of the copalxocotl, called the ‘soap-tree’ by the Spanish, and the sticky root of the xiuhamolli or soap-plant [Saponaria Americana]; both gave a lather rich enough to wash body and clothes. The encyclopedic Florentine Codex, written with Aztec informants shortly after the Conquest, includes a small illustration and description of the amolli soap plant (see Picture 4): It is long and narrow like reeds. It has a shoot; its flower is white. It is a cleanser. The large, the thick [roots] remove one’s hair, make one bald; the small, the slender ones are cleansers, a soap. They wash, they cleanse, they remove the filth.
[img=200x211]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_05_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 5: Washing hair; Florentine Codex, Book 2 (Click on image to enlarge)
Their documents also make frequent mention of deodorants, breath fresheners and dentifrices. (Spaniards of the time cleaned their teeth with urine.) As well as bathing in lakes and rivers, the Aztecs cleaned themselves – often daily – in low sauna-like hot-houses. An external fire heated one of the walls to red-hot, and the bather threw water on the baking wall, creating steam. As in a traditional Russian steam bath, the bathers could speed up perspiration by thrashing themselves with twigs and grasses. Almost every building had such a bath-house or temazcalli, used for medical treatments and ritual purifications as well as ordinary grooming (Picture 6).
[img=200x143]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_06_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 6: Aztec ‘temazcalli’ bathhouse; Codex Tudela folio 62r (Click on image to enlarge)
As Jacques Soustelle has written: ‘A love of cleanliness seems to have been general throughout the population’: the Florentine Codex hints at the importance placed on personal hygiene in documenting the instructions given by an Aztec father to his daughter:-
[In the morning] wash your face, wash your hands, clean your mouth... Listen to me, child: never make up your face nor paint it; never put red on your mouth to look beautiful. Make-up and paint are things that light women use - shameless creatures. If you want your husband to love you, dress well, wash yourself and wash your clothes.
[img=250x152]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_07_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 7: Dortmund - a town in the centre of Europe in the Middle Ages
Into this hygienically enlightened place thundered the Spaniards. The 16th century was one of the dirtiest periods in European history, and on top of that, the Spaniards had their own unique distrust of cleanliness. Europe in general had gone from a culture where people enjoyed a regular trip to the town or neighbourhood bath-house to a culture that shunned water as dangerous.
[img=225x151]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_08_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 8: The Black Death - illustration from the Toggenburg Bible, 1411 (Click on image to enlarge)
The catalyst was the Black Death of 1347, a plague that would ultimately kill at least one out of every three Europeans. When Philippe VI of France asked the medical faculty of the University of Paris to pronounce on this terrifying occurrence in 1348, they wrote that hot baths, which created openings in the skin, allowed disease to enter the body. Bath-houses all over Europe were closed and for four or five hundred years people avoided water as much as possible. For those who wanted to think of themselves as clean, a fresh linen shirt for a man and a fresh chemise for a woman was considered safer and even more effective than water. Louis XIV of France only bathed twice in a long, athletic life but he was regarded as unusually ‘clean’ because he changed his linen shirt twice a day.
[img=200x152]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_09_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 9: ‘Bed bugs and head lice’ - from Hortus Sanitatis, Strassburg, 1499 (Click on image to enlarge)
The 16th-century Spaniards inherited that pan-European fear of water, but they had an additional, peculiarly Spanish aversion to cleanliness. Like every other part of the Roman empire, they had had their own well-patronized bath-houses. But when the Visigoths conquered Spain in the 5th century, they scorned hot baths as effeminate and weakening, and they demolished the bath-houses. By the time the Moors invaded the country in 711, the Spanish had lost the old, bath-loving link. At that point, they saw the Moors’ well-washed ways as part of their heretical convictions, and their own dirtiness as a Christian virtue. (Some early Christians had regarded cleanliness as a dangerous luxury, along with good food, wine and sexual enjoyments, and tried to abstain from it; Spain continued in this austere tradition longer than most.)
 

[img=250x152]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_11_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 11: Diego Rivera’s critical view of the role of the Spanish church in Colonial Mexico - part of his mural of Mexican history, National Palace, Mexico City (Click on image to enlarge)
Richard Ford, a 19th-century English traveller who knew Spain well, spoke for many when he connected a centuries-old Spanish distaste for washing with the Moorish occupation. He wrote:-

The mendicant Spanish monks, according to their practice of setting up a directly antagonistic principle [to the Arabs], considered physical dirt as the test of moral purity and true faith; and by dining and sleeping from year’s end to year’s end in the same unchanged woolen frock, arrived at the height of their ambition, according to their view of the odor of sanctity, the olor de santidad. This was a euphemism for ‘foul smell,’ but it came to represent Christian godliness, and many of the saints are pictured sitting in their own excrement.
[img=200x133]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_12_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 12: Cardinal Cisneros; the ruins of the Moorish Baths at Ronda (Click on image to enlarge)
Cardinal Jiménez de Cisneros, himself a Franciscan - wrote Ford - persuaded King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella to close and abolish the Moorish baths after their conquest of Granada. They forbade not only the Christians but the Moors from using anything but holy water. Fire, not water, became the grand element of inquisitorial purification.
[img=200x134]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_13_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 13: Traditional Moorish baths (Click on image to enlarge)
Sure enough, one of the first things the Spaniards did during the Reconquest was to destroy the Moorish baths (just as the Visigoths had destroyed the Roman ones). Even after that, suspicions remained: Moors who converted to Christianity were forbidden to bathe. During the Inquisition, one of the worst things that could be said about Jews as well as Moors was that they were ‘known to bathe.’ As Richard Ford noted, these attitudes were still current in the 19th century. He tells the story of the Spanish Duke of Frias, who visited an English lady for a fortnight and ‘never once troubled his basins and jugs [on his washstand in his bedroom]; he simply rubbed his face occasionally with the white of an egg.’ This, Ford assures us, was the only ablution used by Spanish ladies in the time of Philip IV, and apparently it was good enough for the Duke.
[img=250x169]http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-3/382_14_1.jpg[/img]
Pic 14: The meeting of Spanish and Aztecs outside Tenochtitlan - a folding screen mural by Roberto Cueva del Río (Click on image to enlarge)
Imagine, then, the redolence of the conquistadores, after weeks of close confinement in a ship, on arrival in a hot country. To make the contrast between the Spaniards and Aztecs even more stark, the Aztecs, being originally Asian, had many fewer merocrine glands than Westerners, and those are the glands that produce sweat. Asians will tell you that even a very clean Westerner smells strong to an Asian nose, so the fragrance of the unwashed conquistadores must have been ... impressive if not downright disgusting to the Aztecs. Small wonder that they responded by fumigating the Spaniards with incense as they approached. The Spaniards took it as an honour, but for thhe Aztecs it was a practical necessity.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
scientific accurrate discussion on iberian looks turned into a shitfest contest


Margids--->Iberberian gracile meds/alpines

Margids are DOMer,taller,broader,stronger,darker,developed  etc

Azteks--->iberians

if you had mentioned balkans or other robust meds/dinaric types I could put it as competition,but iberian dna=incel
 

Magnus

Lookism God
Joined
Oct 31, 2015
Messages
15,086
Reputation
21
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
Yes Aztecs were superior to Spaniards that's why Cortez conquered entire Aztec empire with 300 men

:cage:
What does that have to do with how they look?
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2015
Messages
1,936
Reputation
1
Exactely

this is about their comically tiny skulls and girl frames,aswell as poor bone development giving them faces wich look melted,like yemeni  jews.
 

Br0sk1

Gigachad
Joined
Sep 11, 2015
Messages
8,107
Reputation
237
I think it just depends on the individual. Obviously gracile Med phenotypes are lousy on men, but not every Spaniard is a gracile Med.

Pablo Picasso had an archaic, Neanderthaloid appearance, which was good in his youth. Pity he was a manlet:





 

YourFaceIsYourLife

LTR = cuck | Effort = it's over | Sun = life
Masculinity Crew
Joined
Nov 10, 2015
Messages
6,388
Reputation
1,581
Magnus said:
YourFaceIsYourLife said:
Yes Aztecs were superior to Spaniards that's why Cortez conquered entire Aztec empire with 300 men

:cage:
What does that have to do with how they look?
Because they beat Aztecs in hand to hand combat, which would suggest they were taller, bigger framed and bigger skulled.
[hr]
Sui Generis II said:
Do you ever post on anything not about race?

Why even leave Apricity when that's their focus?
He should get banned, these type of threads are against the rules.
 
Top